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PTA Events

Hilltowns Responding to Environmental Crises

A Practical Approach in Four Events

Practical responses to environmental crises will be discussed in a series of events sponsored by the Plainfield Tree Alliance and the Plainfield Agricultural Commission beginning January 27 and continuing through April 2020.

“Hilltowns Responding to Environmental Crises:  a Practical Approach” a four-event lecture series includes presentations by local experts about how our yards and gardens can enhance biodiversity and combat climate change.

All events are open to the public and will be held on at the Plainfield Public Safety Complex, 38 N. Central St., Plainfield, MA.

Monday Jan. 27, 7PM
Book discussion: Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy
Moderators:  Amy Pulley and Patrick Williamson

Monday Feb. 17, 7PM
Our Landscape and Global Climate Change
    Brittany Laginhas, UMass Amherst

Monday Mar. 16, 7PM (Postponed indefinitely)
Gardening for Wildlife
Desiree Narango, CUNY

Monday Ap. 20, 7PM (postponed indefinitely)
Creating and Supporting Biodiversity in Your Landscape
Larri Cochran

This program is co-sponsored by the Plainfield Agricultural Commission and funded in part by the Plainfield Cultural Council.

For more information, contact  Anne Williamson (413) 634- 5695, annekwilliamson@gmail.com. Find more information about the events on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Plainfield-Tree-Alliance-309747003204594/

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PTA Events

PLAINFIELD’S FIRST ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION, APRIL 27-28, 2019

Thanks to the International Society of Arboriculture and Eversource for their support

Wait a minute for slideshow to load. To move faster, click on the images.Photographers: Polly Ryan, Elizabeth Lambert, Melissa Hancock, and Roxanne Shearer

2019 ARBOR DAY WEEKEND – PROGRAMS

MORE ON ARBOR DAY

“The Roots of Arbor Day in America” (Freedom’s Way Natural Heritage Area).
A History of Arbor Day (Arbor Day Foundation). With historical images.

Grant Wood’s Arbor Day (left) depicts a school scene in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, as it might have looked in the 1890s. It was commissioned in 1932 by the Cedar Rapids School Board as a memorial to two schoolteachers, one of whom planted a tree each year to shelter the school. The painting was owned by the school it portrayed, McKinley High School, until 1935. Later, it was bought by the Hollywood producer King Vidor, and in 1985 sold at auction by his family to an unidentified American buyer.